Crossroads, Conversations, and Amorality

By: Kayleigh R. Thiel

I think the writer, as I’ve said before, is completely amoral. He takes whatever he needs, wherever he needs, and he does that openly and honestly because he himself hopes that what he does will be good enough so that after him people will take from him, and they are welcome to take from him, as he feels that he would be welcome by the best of his predecessors to take what they had done.     –William Faulkner

At a Q&A in John Coleman’s classroom in February of 1957, William Faulkner answered questions posed by novice writers. Faulkner’s words perfectly embody last month’s Southern Literary Festival, which was sponsored in part by MTSU Write. Preparing for the Southern Literary Festival, I had surmised that festivals such as this were an amazing opportunity for writers to connect across generations and cultural backgrounds. Then I realized that the writers who are no longer with us, such as the great William Faulkner, had left everything behind for the living. Their works, preserved in museums and in new editions, taught by professors to students and grandparents to grandchildren, have become an open window for contemporary, new writers. And this open window is the reason the Southern Literary Festival is paramount to the celebration of writers’ legacies. Robert Penn Warren directed the first Southern Literary Festival in 1937 at Blue Mountain College, and this year, Ann Patchett delivered the keynote for this extraordinary event at Middle Tennessee State University. At these conferences, writers share with one another, with their mentors, with their students – there is no limit to the experiences and encouragement passed between each connection made; in addition, we must remember that these festivals are a celebration of those writers who left a part of themselves behind in their writing.

Their words are like an inspirational map linking contemporary writers to the past. Courtney Gulbro, a current student with the MTSU Write program, commented on the importance of the writing community’s learning and connecting, “Regardless of genre, the more a writer knows, the richer her writing. Learning about myriad topics, time periods, regions, and cultures opens the writer’s eyes to aspects of characters, settings, etc., that might otherwise be missed. Those aspects make the individual reader’s experience with the work more meaningful and fosters that sense of connectedness to the book and the author. When a writer connects with writers from these other areas it opens pathways for learning and growth both individually and as a writer, and enriches the life of the writer.” Furthermore, Kory Wells, MTSU Write mentor, author of the poetry collection Heaven Was the Moon and two-time finalist for the Rash Award for Poetry, shared her thoughts on the mind of an intuitive writer. “In her poem ‘Fireflies,’ Cecilia Woloch lists one of her vices as ‘living inside my head,’ something I think many of us writers do. Do we write because we live inside our heads, or do we live inside our heads because we write? I can’t say, but I do know that one strong antidote to that condition is attending literary festivals. For me, the best of such events offer a package deal, if you will, of creative inspiration, education, encouragement, and a broadening of awareness and community.” Wells specifically discusses how the Southern Literary Festival of 2016 offered a plethora of inspiration from presenters such as Matthew Leavitt Brown, Gaylord Brewer, and Kamilah Aisha Moon. She states: “Experienced writers and editors often refer to literature as an ‘ongoing conversation’ of writers past and present, and while nothing replaces the need for writers to read voraciously, literary festivals are a marvelous extension of that conversation.”

Both Gulbro and Wells discuss the assembly of writers as a journey for personal actualization and creative expression within a supportive community. The Southern Literary Festival of 2016 was an extraordinary event for contemporary students and writers to revitalize the prominence of the literary world. Flannery O’Connor puts it this way: “The writer operates at a peculiar crossroads where time and place and eternity somehow meet. His problem is to find that location.”

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Words Make Worlds

by Kayleigh Thiel

As a novice, a newbie, a rookie (or any other synonym for “enthusiastically clueless”), I begin my internship duties forgetting to breathe. I wish writing were like riding a bike – but unfortunately, writing is not even something that continues effortlessly while you are in the act. Because of all the unseen and forgotten edits and the peremptory – yet unwanted – 20-minute intermissions when ideas are on break, the act of writing is a personal experience, meant to be thrust under the eyes of judgmental strangers. Why do writers do this to themselves? Well, when I write, all of those descriptions and ideas that distract me from my classes finally have somewhere to go – call it a subliminal defense mechanism against schizophrenia.

I often wonder if other writers feel this same way – that there are so many words and pictures floating around in his or her mind, and it all must get on paper in a way that sounds a little more educated than gibberish. Normally, I turn to my favorite pieces of writing to inspire me, which is never a good idea because then I decide that there is no way these successful, award-winning writers feel anything like me. They most likely spew brilliance, and then edit tiny grammatical errors. Their literary richness is to Jay Gatsby as mine is to Oliver Twist. So one day, after having read an excellent short story in a literary magazine, I decided to praise the author. I wanted to link my world with hers, to wave and lock eyes with royalty while I stood-by on the street. Nervously, I typed an email that described how much her story had inspired me; I praised her cleverness and imagery; I told her that she should never stop writing because I had already read all of her other works and needed more. Then I clicked send.

I imagined her literary agent flippantly deleting my message, as there were obviously more important messages from the New York Times and international publishers to read. Or, I pictured this author scanning my email, then lighting a cigarette and smiling with a “well isn’t that cute” attitude as she deleted it. So imagine my surprise when the author herself wrote me back within the hour. She was as enthusiastic as myself, matching my bright-eyed praise and smiley-face icons with exclamation marks and blushing thank you’s. Adding to her humble humanity, she told me that my message came at a great time because she was suffering writer’s block – her ideas were on break like mine! Maybe, they were on break together.

Immediately, I realized that this was what I had forgotten. Writers are the only ones who know what and how writers think. By simply engaging in the act of writing, writers become a community. This togetherness and understanding comprises the encouragement that keeps us going. There is no royalty in writing – we are all common people with profound ideas. Though there are novices and published writers, the only difference between the two is perseverance. And this is great news because it means that award-winning writers have been just as enthusiastically clueless as myself.

I am so proud to be a part of the MTSU Write Program for this reason. Established writers humbly accept the challenge to guide new, genius writers who will no doubt grow from their mentors’ camaraderie and support. There is no hierarchy or class system because we are a community, collectively shaping our craft and passionately sharing our experiences.

Kayleigh Thiel is a senior at Middle Tennessee State University. She is majoring in English and  has published two works, including a short story in the Collage Fall 2015 issue. Kayleigh is the writing intern for MTSU Write for the 2016 Spring semester.

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SPRING NEWSLETTER

Below you will find information related to the program and writing in general. Please send your updates to me at theloftmtsu@gmail.com.

–Karen Alea Ford

Registration for Summer Session closes May 25th. It starts June 1st and lasts until August 31st. Feel free to email me with questions.

More info HERE

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

April 16-19 at MTSU Alumni Weekend and May (TBA) at Cultivating Creativity (http://www.cultivatecoworking.com)– Karen Alea Ford will be sharing info about MTSU Write to the public. Email for details or if you have a writing group or organization you’d like us to attend. Theloftmtsu@gmail.com

 

April 25—SHORT STORY MODULE

Hemingway, Munro, Bradbury, Poe–They are masters of the Short Story. What are the elements of short fiction, and how does it differ from novels?

Whether you have written short stories or not, this module will go over the nitty-gritty of the craft as well as the publishing market. Bring a notebook and pen.  No need to bring a written piece.

Registration is at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/short-story-module-tickets-16282445232

General Admission is $20 cash or check (made to Luke Wiget). MTSU Write alumni and students are Free.

Lunch at Boulevard Grill afterwards.

Instructor: Luke Wiget

Luke Wiget

 

Luke Wiget is a writer and musician who lives in Nashville, Tennessee by way of Brooklyn, New York. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Green Mountains ReviewSmokeLong QuarterlyHobartBOMBHeavy Feather Review, and The Rumpus, among others. He has an MFA in Fiction from The New School University, where, in addition to teaching, he developed and continues to produce AUDIOGRAPH, a podcast that documents the readings and conversations hosted by The Writing Program. Luke is co-curator and host of drDOCTOR, a literary and arts podcast and reading series based in Brooklyn. You can find Luke on Twitter @godsteethandme

 

May 25th—Deadline to sign up for Summer Term. www.mtsu.edu/write

 

September 26th—THIRD Annual Creative Writers Conference of Middle Tennessee. Speakers TBA. Registration will open by May. Save the date!

 

FACULTY NEWS

 

Gloria Ballard

Gloria has continued to write travel pieces for The Tennessean. With Spring finally popping through, she is also very busy as The Tennessean garden expert. Find her articles here: http://www.tennessean.com/search/Gloria%20Ballard/

 

Bill Brown

Bill Brown’s new book, Elemental, was released in November ’14 by 3: A Taos Press, Denver. He led the poetry workshop at January Jumpstart for Tennessee Mountain Writers, gave the Keynote speech at the Christopher-Newport Writers Conference in Newport News, Virginia in February ’15. He has poetry readings at Vanderbilt Barnes and Noble on March 27 with Jeff Hardin, Tiana Clark and Walker Bass. He has readings is April for the Nashville Chapter of the Women’s National Book Association and The Chattanooga Writers Guild. His new work appears in River Styx, Tar River Poetry, Common Ground, Connecticut River Review, POEM, Aurorean, Clover, Birmingham Poetry Review, Birmingham Arts Journal, Big Muddy and Coudbank. I have two April readings: Nashville chapter of the Women’s National Book Association and The Chattanooga Writers Guild.

 

Jennifer Chesak

“I recently took a trip to my native state of North Dakota to do some research on a novel I’m working on. I asked my dad to be my chauffeur and tour guide, and as he drove me around the state, which has changed incredibly since the 2008 oil boom. I had the opportunity to learn about stuff from his childhood and early adulthood that I never knew before. A day I thought would simply be about garnering research turned out to be so much more than that, and I will treasure the experience forever.

Additionally, I just completed the index coding of a 500-page birding book for a world-famous birder and first-time author. It was an incredible experience to navigate the process of what goes into indexing. I have a newfound respect for taxonomy and birding!

This spring I am planning a vacation to Big Sur in California to carve out some personal writing time, and I am looking forward to a travel-packed summer of reviewing remote Canadian fishing lodges for several outdoor magazines.”

 

Charlotte Rains Dixon

Charlotte has attained representation with literary agent Erin Niumata of Folio Literary in NYC.

 

Jeff Hardin

My third collection, Restoring the Narrative, which won the Donald Justice Poetry Prize from the West Chester University Poetry Center, is in the production stage and should be published some time over the summer.

My fourth collection, Small Revolution, has been accepted by Aldrich Press and is scheduled to appear in January 2016.

I have poems recently appearing in or forthcoming from The Hudson Review, Southern Review, The Laurel Review, Bluestem, Grist, Big Muddy, and Tupelo Quarterly.

Red Hydra Press is printing Until That Yellow Bird Returns, a letterpress chapbook of five-line poems.

 

Terry Price

Who can keep up with Terry? Check out all he is up to at www.terryprice.net

 

Kory Wells

“I have poetry forthcoming in Unsplendid and Broad River Review, where I was a finalist for their 2014 Ron Rash Award. Last fall I served as a teaching artist with the Nashville Poetry & Prints project through a partnership headed by Watkins College; my particular assignment, to help senior refugees from a variety of nations write about their lives, was both challenging and very moving. I was also the featured poet at the 12th annual Martin Methodist College Literary Festival, where my daughter Kelsey Wells provided old-time music to accompany select poems. More recently, I conducted a workshop on how songs can inspire or inform poetry for the mid-winter meeting of the Alabama State Poetry Society.”

 

**I’d like to extend our condolences to Linda Busby Parker on the passing of her mother. Linda stays as busy as ever, but I know we all wish her rest and renewal.

 

Alumni and Students:

 

Tiana Clark

Tiana was accepted into Vanderbilt University’s MFA program for poetry. Mentors Jeff Hardin and Bill Brown assisted with her application.

 

Sandy Coomer

Her second poetry collection containing 40 poems and titled, The Presence of Absence, won the 2014 Janice Keck Literary Award for Poetry and was published in December 2014. It is available on Amazon, Barnes&Noble.com and in Landmark Booksellers in Franklin, Parnassus in Green Hills, and East Side Story in east Nashville.

 

Amber Hart

Amber has had four stories accepted for publication. Neon Literary Mag Issue #41 (due out Mid 2015), Storgy (forthcoming date TBD), Cheat River Review (April), Gravel Literary Journal (May).

 

Cathleen Reid

Cathleen is 3/4 the way through with her book about her battle with cancer. She is actively working on her blog at www.daddyswarriorprincess.com

 

 

WEBSITES and BLOGS

Gloria Ballard

http://thegardenbench.wordpress.com

http://gloriaballard.wordpress.com

www.gloriaballard.com

Ashley Loar

www.brilliantmediocrity.blogspot.com

Jeff Hardin

www.jeffhardin.weebly.com

Leisa Hammett

www.LeisaHammett.com

Jennifer Chesak

www.wanderinginthewordspress.com

www.wanderinginthewords.com

https://twitter.com/jenchesak

Michael Potts

http://www.michael-potts.com
Author’s Amazon Page: http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Potts/e/B006EC8XKW/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/potts-end-of-summer?keyword=potts+end+of+summer&store=allproducts

Charlotte Dixon Rains

http://www.charlotterainsdixon.com

Emily Davidson Nemoy

emilydavidsonnemoy.com

Kory Wells

http://www.facebook.com/korywells

http://twitter.com/korywells

http://www.korywells.com/

Candace White

www.aintgotenoughgravy.com

 

OPPORTUNITIES

 

See the Mountain Heritage Literary Festival website for writing contest and fellowship opportunities. http://www.lmunet.edu/mhlf/index.shtml

 

Hindman Settlement School summer workshop deadline approaching. See https://www.hindmansettlement.org/events/writers-workshop/#

 

See mentor websites for more opportunities.

###

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May Newsletter

Below you will find information related to the program and writing in general. Please send your updates to me at theloftmtsu@gmail.com.

–Karen Alea Ford

Registration for Summer Session closes May 25th. It starts June 1st and lasts until August 31st. $1,000. Feel free to email me with questions.

More info HERE

FACULTY NEWS

Two of our mentors, Bill Brown and Jeff Hardin, along with former student Tiana Clark, will be part of Scarritt-Bennett’s Poet’s Corner.

photo 1

photo 2

Bill Brown: “I have the feature poem for the May issue of Nashville Arts Magazine announcing my May 22 reading at Scaritt-Bennett’s Poet’s Corner. My new book, Elemental, is due out in September. I lead late summer and fall workshops at Orr Mountain Winery and Chattanooga Writers Guild. I’ll be the keynote speaker for the Christopher Newport University Writers Conference in Newport News VA. Feb, 2015.”

Linda Busby Parker: Linda’s busy schedule

May 20, 2014    Guest speaker for the Medical Society of Mobile County.  Program title: “Creative Imaging:  Fact to Fiction.”

June 8, 2014   Speaker at Springhill Presbyterian Church in a series of twelve programs titled “An Ever Rolling Stream:  Expressions of Faith through the Ages.”  My topic is “Spiritual Writing:  Connecting Past, Present, and Future.”  Other speakers include the Poet Laureate of Alabama, a couple of art historians, musicians, and specialists on religious architecture.  This should be fun!  Nothing like stretching your wings—right?

May 28-June 23    I will be teaching a “special topics” course at the University of South Alabama titled “Plots and Storylines: Narrative Structure.”  This course will be taught on the accelerated semester—a whole semester taught in slightly less than a month!  Double sessions five days a week—it’s a sprint, not a marathon.  I’ll run fast for four weeks!

Have a review of Roy Hoffman’s novel, Come Landfall in the next issue of 2nd and Church—this issue should be out soon. Mentoring in The Loft this summer.  Looking forward to that!  Meanwhile, continuing to read and write.

Alumni and Students:
Margie Hunter: Two poems have been accepted for publication in Number One, the journal of Volunteer State Community College. “Smoky Jazz” and “Summer Tomatoes.”
Amanda Moon: Stealing the Ruby Slippers releases on May 13! Physical copies can be ordered through my website or through Amazon, digitally it’s available exclusively through Amazon for the first three months, then will be in all of the other outlets.

STEALING THE RUBY SLIPPERS
Jared Canning is out of money and out of time. His gambling debts are due, and his creditors are not the kind that grant extensions. An old friend offers him a job: break into a small town museum, steal a pair Ruby Slippers Judy Garland wore in the Wizard of Oz, and share the profits when they are sold to a buyer in New Orleans.
On August 25, 2005, Jared pulls off the heist perfectly.
The next day, Jared watches Hurricane Katrina slam into New Orleans. His buyer, and his money, are gone.
Jared has a creditor with a thirst for blood on his tail, the police knocking on his door, and the most famous shoes in the country hidden in his dirty laundry. He needs to outsmart a sexy, scheming girlfriend, a drunk buddy who saw too much, and just possibly himself in order to find his way out.
Stealing the Ruby Slippers imagines wild possibilities for a real life mystery, blending fact and fiction to keep you guessing until the last page.

 

WEBSITES and BLOGS

Gloria Ballard

http://thegardenbench.wordpress.com

http://gloriaballard.wordpress.com

www.gloriaballard.com

Ashley Loar

www.brilliantmediocrity.blogspot.com

Jeff Hardin

www.jeffhardin.weebly.com

Leisa Hammett

www.LeisaHammett.com

Jennifer Chesak

www.wanderinginthewordspress.com

www.wanderinginthewords.com

https://twitter.com/jenchesak

Michael Potts

http://www.michael-potts.com
Author’s Amazon Page: http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Potts/e/B006EC8XKW/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/potts-end-of-summer?keyword=potts+end+of+summer&store=allproducts

Charlotte Dixon Rains

http://www.charlotterainsdixon.com

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor

http://www.teachersacup.com

Emily Davidson Nemoy

emilydavidsonnemoy.com

Kory Wells

http://www.facebook.com/korywells

http://twitter.com/korywells

http://www.korywells.com/

Candace White

www.aintgotenoughgravy.com

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Registration for The Writer’s Loft Summer Term is now open. Deadline is May 25th.

Non-degree
Work from home
Poetry
Non-fiction
Fiction 
Write YOUR Story.

 

Work one-on-one with a writing mentor, June 1-August 31st. register at:

http://www.mtsu.edu/theloft/theloftapp.php

“When I enrolled at The Writer’s Loft, I was paired with a mentor who changed my thinking and writing to the point that I finally believed that I was a writer. If you secretly know this about yourself, come to the Loft and begin to believe it out loud.”

–Suzanne Robertson

 “I have found the Writer’s Loft program at MTSU to be the most valuable of all the programs I have attended for improving my writing skills. The teachers go above and beyond the call of duty to help a writer achieve excellence.”

–Michael Potts

“I found my voice. Before I signed up for The Writer’s Loft, I was unfocused, and after 3 sessions spread over a few years, I hit my stride.”

–Patty Outlaw

 “The Loft gave me community as well as craft. It provided a way to understand the submission process, the business of publishing, what editors seek and how to find writer resources. Knowing other writers and sharing their accomplishments continues to provide incentive to keep the fires burning.”

–Peggy Duke

 

Joining our faculty for the summer:

 

Image
​Marcus Jackson was born and raised in Toledo, Ohio. After earning his BA at the University of Toledo, he continued his poetry studies in NYU’s graduate creative writing program and as a Cavem Canem fellow. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Harvard Review, and The Cincinnati Review, among many other publications. His chapbook, Rundown, was published by Aureole Press in 2009. His debut full-length collection of poems, entitled Neighborhood Register, was released in 2011.

Image

 Jennifer Wachtel Kates is a Tennessee native who earned her M.A. in creative writing from the University of Southern Mississippi’s Center for Writers and her Ph.D. in creative writing from Georgia State University.  She teaches fiction writing at Middle Tennessee State University, where she has taught in the English department for the past sixteen years.  Her short stories have appeared in The Southwestern Review and GSU Review, where her story “Egg and Spoon” earned the short fiction award.  She is the recipient of the Allen Tate Creative Writing Award, and serves as faculty advisor for Collage and Future Authors of America as well as two other student organizations.  She is a volunteer and advocate for Autism Speaks Tennessee, for which she earned the MTSU Faculty Outstanding Public Service Award.  She lives in Murfreesboro with her three sons.

 A complete list of our award-winning, dedicated mentors can be found at http://www.mtsu.edu/theloft/theloftmentors.php

 Our newsletter, which includes recent accomplishments of mentors and students, can be found at https://mtsuwrite.wordpress.com.

 More about the program is at www.mtsu.edu/theloft.

 I am happy to answer any questions. theloftmtsu@gmail.com

Karen Alea Ford

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April Newsletter

April, 2014

Below you will find information related to the program and writing in general. Please send your updates to me at theloftmtsu@gmail.com.

–Karen Alea Ford

NEWS

Save the Date: Our Fall Conference will be held Saturday, September 20th at MTSU. More details to come.

The novel workshop with Darnell Arnoult on April 26th is full. We look forward to seeing many of you there. Yes, we’ll arrange for her to return!

Registration for Summer Session opens soon. It starts June 1st and lasts until August 31st. $1,000. Feel free to email me with questions.

 

FACULTY NEWS

Gloria Ballard:  A feature by nonfiction mentor Gloria Ballard, “Garden events bloom after a long, cold winter,” appeared in The Tennessean on March 29. http://www.tennessean.com/story/life/home-garden/2014/03/27/garden-events-bloom-long-cold-winter/6982125/

Bill Brown: I have new work forthcoming in River Styx, Broad River Review, Conclave: Journal of Character, Number One, and Nashville Arts Magazine May edition. I will be reading a new poem, “Dance” for the artist, Carlos Barela in an Ekphrases event at the Ortega Gallery in Phoenix, Az, May 2. My Poem “The Names of Creeks” was selected for Poetry in the Parks and will be preserved on Granite at Edmond’s Park outside of Boston, MA.

Linda Busby Parker: I’m reviewing Roy Hoffman’s new novel, COME LANDFALL (Tuscaloosa:  University of Alabama Press, 2014), for the writers’ magazine 2ND AND CHURCH; that same book review will also appear on-line at the Alabama Writer’s Forum website.  It’s the story of three women, war, and the men they loved and is set on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

Roy Burkhead spoke for the Pensters March meeting in Fairhope, Alabama.  Actually, we double-teamed—I asked questions about 2ND AND CHURCH and he answered them.  He answered them very well!!  The Pensters loved him.  He nowhas a following on Alabama’s Gulf Coast.  The Loft makes so many great connections possible.  I’ve attached photos.

I entered the RIVER STYX Flash Fiction Contest—top prize was $!,000 and a case of micro-brewed beer.  My piece, “Stage Whispers,” was a semi-finalist.  Very nice—but no beer.

Terry Price, Charlotte Dixon and I are working on a program proposal for the next AWP Conference (Associated Writing Programs) in Minneapolis, 2015.  The program title is–“Creating Characters from the Inside Out: Tools and Inspiration.”

Meanwhile, I have been writing, writing, writing!

 Kory Wells:

I’m participating in the Big Poetry Giveaway, a nationwide blogging event, on my blog at http://korywells.com/2014/03/the-big-poetry-giveaway/
Also on my blog is a round-up of articles about National Poetry Month here in middle Tennessee, including one by Loft alumni Sandy Coomer and my own in The Murfreesboro Pulsehttp://korywells.com/2014/04/middle-tennessee-poetry-news/
I’m just back from the Tennessee Mountain Writers workshop, where I had presented ideas for starting – or building a better – blog, and presented my poetry with the help of musician Kelsey Wells.
Alumni and Students:
Amanda Moon:

My book, Your Pilates Life, is available for free download: http://books.noisetrade.com/amandamichellemoon/your-pilates-life.
Last weekend I attended the Prairie Gate Literary Festival at University of Minnesota Morris and got to attend wonderful workshops by Joanna Scott and Matt Hart. In Matt’s workshop, focused on poetry, we practiced different “tricks” to get writing. This was my favorite: Go to a story that sells paint. Pick out one sample page with three or more colors on it. Pick out one singe color sample. Write a poem using all of the color names, in the order they appear on the samples. Your single color can go at the beginning or the end. In Joanna’s we talked about narrative voice and studied examples from “Exercises in Style” by Raymond Queneau. Really, really interesting read and I highly recommend it- he writes the same story 99 times, but using a different style each time.
My first novel, Stealing the Ruby Slippers will be available on May 12! Information available here: http://amandamichellemoon.com/writing/stealing-the-ruby-slippers.
Leisa Hammett: “You do know about “Listen to Your Mother, Nashville,” right? You’re gonna laugh. You’re gonna cry. And, you’re going to be really sorry if you miss our one-time performance about the beauty and the beast of motherhood, Sat. Apr. 26, 7 PM, TPAC-Tennessee Performing Arts Center‘s Polk Theater.”
Kimberly Cross Teter: The Loft is very excited to announce that Kimberly’s middle-grade historical novel Isabella’s Libretto will be published by Excaliber Press. The press date is in the Fall, and we all look forward to holding one in our hands! Congrats, Kimberly!

 

WEBSITES and BLOGS

Gloria Ballard

http://thegardenbench.wordpress.com

http://gloriaballard.wordpress.com

www.gloriaballard.com

Ashley Loar

www.brilliantmediocrity.blogspot.com

Jeff Hardin

www.jeffhardin.weebly.com

Leisa Hammett

www.LeisaHammett.com

Jennifer Chesak

www.wanderinginthewordspress.com

www.wanderinginthewords.com

https://twitter.com/jenchesak

Michael Potts

http://www.michael-potts.com
Author’s Amazon Page: http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Potts/e/B006EC8XKW/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/potts-end-of-summer?keyword=potts+end+of+summer&store=allproducts

Charlotte Dixon Rains

http://www.charlotterainsdixon.com

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor

http://www.teachersacup.com

Emily Davidson Nemoy

emilydavidsonnemoy.com

Kory Wells

http://www.facebook.com/korywells

http://twitter.com/korywells

http://www.korywells.com/

Candace White

www.aintgotenoughgravy.com

OPPORTUNITIES

*Spoken word artist Minton Sparks (www.mintonsparks.com) will be teaching her next workshop Saturday, May 3rd. Details are below:
Saturday, May 3rd
1 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Scarritt Bennett Center
1008 19th Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37212
***Space is limited to 20 participants. Registration closes Friday, April 25th at 5 p.m.
 PRICE: $125
WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION: www.mintonsparks.com/workshop

 * Barbara Mandigo Kelly Peace Poetry Awards

Sponsor:          Nuclear Age Peace Foundation

SYNOPSIS:  The Nuclear Age Peace Foundation provides an award to
encourage poets to explore and illuminate positive visions of peace
and the human spirit. All poems must be the original work of the poet,
unpublished, and in English.

Deadline(s):      07/01/2014
Barbara Mandigo Kelly Peace Poetry Awards
PMB 121
1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 1
Santa Barbara, CA 93108-2794
U.S.A.

Web Site: http://www.peacecontests.org/
Program URL: http://www.peacecontests.org/poetry/index.php

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April 18, 2014 · 6:12 pm

March Newsletter

Below you will find information related to the program and writing in general. Please send your updates to me at theloftmtsu@gmail.com.

–Karen Alea Ford

Upcoming Event

Novel Workshop with Darnell Arnoult
Drafting the Novel

What is the difference between the terms “story” and “novel”? Stories happen, novels are constructed. Novels are the architecture of what happened, revealing events and information to the reader in the most seductive and engaging way so as to keep the reader’s interest from the first page to the last. In this workshop we will explore novel structure along with global and linear approaches to creating the story and the architecture.

Cost
Free for Writer’s Loft graduates and current students.
General Public–$20 CASH or CHECK (to MTSU) at event.

Date
Saturday, April 26th, 10-12

Address
Peck Hall, 3rd Floor, MTSU

About Darnell
Darnell Arnoult is the writer-in- residence and co-director of the Mountain Heritage Literary Festival at Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, TN. She is also co-editor of the literary magazine, Draft Horse. She is prize-winning author of What Travels With Us: Poems (LSU Press) and the novel Sufficient Grace (Free Press). Her shorter works have appeared in a variety of journals, including Appalachian Heritage, Asheville Poetry Review, Nantahala Review, Now and Then, Sandhills Review, Southern Cultures, Southern Exposure, and Southwest Review.
Darnell holds an MFA from University of Memphis and an MA from NC State, and is a regular faculty member of the Table Rock Writers Workshop, Tennessee Young Writers Workshop, John C. Campbell Folk School, and Learning Events.
She was the recipient of the Weatherford Award for Appalachian Literature, SIBA Poetry Book of the Year, Mary Frances Hobson Medal for Arts and Letters, and in 2007 was named Tennessee Writer of the Year by the Tennessee Writers Alliance.

TO REGISTER, CLICK HERE.

NEWS

Mentor Gloria Ballard–Gloria had a non-fiction travel piece in a recent Tennessean: Chattanooga From the Outside In, with sidebars on the Bluff View Art District, Spring Break Safari and other features was published in The Tennessean on March 9. http://www.tennessean.com/article/20140309/TRAVEL/303090030/Chattanooga-looks-good-from-outside-in

WEBSITES and BLOGS

Karen Alea (Ford)

http://www.karenalea.com

Gloria Ballard

http://thegardenbench.wordpress.com

http://gloriaballard.wordpress.com

www.gloriaballard.com

Ashley Loar

www.brilliantmediocrity.blogspot.com

Jeff Hardin

www.jeffhardin.weebly.com

Leisa Hammett

www.LeisaHammett.com

Jennifer Chesak

www.wanderinginthewordspress.com

www.wanderinginthewords.com

https://twitter.com/jenchesak

Michael Potts

http://www.michael-potts.com
Author’s Amazon Page: http://www.amazon.com/Michael-Potts/e/B006EC8XKW/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Barnes & Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/potts-end-of-summer?keyword=potts+end+of+summer&store=allproducts

Charlotte Dixon Rains

http://www.charlotterainsdixon.com

Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor

http://www.teachersacup.com

Emily Davidson Nemoy

emilydavidsonnemoy.com

Kory Wells

http://www.facebook.com/korywells

http://twitter.com/korywells

http://www.korywells.com/

Candace White

www.aintgotenoughgravy.com

Opportunities

Front Porch, the online literary journal of Texas State University’s MFA, invites all writers to submit works of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry for our Summer 2014 issue.
http://frontporchjournal.com http://frontporchjournal.com

Front Porch is dedicated to publishing the most celebrated talents in contemporary writing published alongside exceptional new voices. Our editors seek out both innovative and traditional literature. In short, we’re looking for insightful and relevant writing that excels, regardless of form, theme, or style.

Our submissions are rolling with no deadline and submitted online through Front Porch’sonline submission manager. The guidelines and submission manager can be accessed here: http://www.frontporchjournal.com/submit.asp http://www.frontporchjournal.com/submit.asp
If you’re interested in the work we publish, our entire archives are available online, andissue 25 http://www.frontporchjournal.com/, our Winter 2013 issue, was recently published.

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